Cold Snow, Warm Feet

I was supposed to join a hike in Harriman but discovered at the last minute that Odie the Labradoodle wouldn’t be welcome.  It wasn’t personal: some groups have developed policies, out of respect to certain members, that limit who can accompany a group hike.  So Odie and I headed north instead, for our first spring hike in the Catskills.

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Cold Snow, Warm Feet

Notes from a hike

Time is short and so in lieu of writing up a narrative, here are some notes and images from a recent traverse of Graham, Balsam Lake, Hunter, East Rusk, Rusk, and SW Hunter — 27 miles that left me tired and hungry, but which contained several memorable moments, thanks to glorious February sunshine, dramatic winds, and the unavoidable adventures associated with nighttime bushwhacking.

The pleasure and value of every walk or journey we take may be doubled to us by carefully noting down the impression it makes upon us….It was not till after I got home that I really went to Maine, or to the Adirondacks, or to Canada.  Out of the chaotic and nebulous impressions which these expeditions gave me, I evolved the real experience.  There is hardly anything that does not become much more in the telling than in the thinking or in the feeling.

— John Burroughs

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Notes from a hike

Discovering the Grid

Low hills flank the Thru-way, and through the car window you see mostly trees.  On the drive up this morning, the sky is clear, and the sun’s rays are pouring down with such intensity that every detail of the passing trees stands out:  stout trunks spattered with lichen and tangled with vines, leafless branches reaching, twisting, interweaving.  The clarity is astonishing:  it’s like a geometric pattern, brightly-lit but bewildering.

However, there’s a spot just north of New Paltz where the road dips and the hills pull back, and for a moment a vista of the Catskill Mountains is revealed.  This morning they appear huge and rounded, a soft mottled mix of brown and tan, flanks dappled with blue cloud shadows.  The detail has seemingly melted away with distance, and the mountain plateau looks like some kind of lost world – but the vision is divulged for only an instant before the road rises back into the hills again.

Of course, closer to the mountains more details emerge; the ridge tops resolve into jagged lines of spruce and fir tinged white.  I arrive at the Devil’s Tombstone Campground full of enthusiasm, imagining all the peaks I could climb today, but on opening the car door, feeling the cool air, and staring down at the ice sheet that covers the parking lot, some reality seeps back in.  Also, with a few aches and pains to be mindful of, maybe it’d be smarter to take it easy.

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Discovering the Grid