Vantage Point Over Zion

Heading west from Moab, I’m hearing reports that Zion National Park is pretty crowded (someone mentions the main valley can be accessed only via shuttle bus).  Thus I’m delighted when my friend Anna tells me of a hike that bypasses the crowds.  Drive to Zion Ponderosa Ranch, she continues, and they’ll point you to the trailhead a short distance away….

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Vantage Point Over Zion

Down into the Grand Canyon, and Back Up Again

A year or so ago casting around for new challenges, I google’d “barefoot Grand Canyon,” and that’s when I discovered Thea Gavin, a free-spirited writer and self-styled “suburbanite chronically injured running grandma,” who’d hiked from one rim of the Grand Canyon to the other, descending roughly 5,000 feet and them climbing back out, for a total journey of 24 miles, all without shoes.  When conventional boot-clad hikers in the Canyon asked why, she responded, “It’s fun.”

This spring I began planning a western trip to the Grand Canyon and other places I’d never been.  Business matters interceded, the trip was delayed, put on hold, and then finally thrown together at the last minute with destinations to be figured out on the fly.

Now it’s late morning, August 7, and I’m pulling in to Kanab, Utah, which I’ve designated as my final staging point prior to entering Grand Canyon National Park.  Priority of work: lunch, laundry, gas, obtain a wi-fi connection to download maps and review the route, and hopefully find an espresso.  The strategy is to enter the park after dark (avoiding the crowds and the heat), attempt a barefoot descent of the Bright Angel Trail to the Colorado River, and then turn around and climb back up.

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Down into the Grand Canyon, and Back Up Again

Setting Foot in Yosemite (for the very first time)

My four-week southwestern pilgrimage is drawing to a close, and what stands between my current location in Mammoth Lakes and the San Francisco airport is. . . . Yosemite National Park, John Muir’s temple of the wilderness, in which “every rock seems to glow with life.”

This is sacred ground, with 4.3 million visitors last year.  This year, having just reopened after a month’s closure due to forest fires, no doubt the park will be thronged.  What’s needed is a thoughtful plan:  an infiltration route from a remote trailhead to a suitable vantage point overlooking the valley, sparing me the crowds below.  A chance encounter with a friendly trail volunteer supplies me with exactly this:  a 16-mile route from Porcupine Creek Trailhead to North Dome and the top of Yosemite Falls.

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Setting Foot in Yosemite (for the very first time)

A Visit to the Coral Pink Sand Dunes

Working on the route from Zion to Grand Canyon, a little dot pops up on the map:  Coral Pink Sand Dunes.  Who doesn’t like scrambling around in sand?  How could you not want to check out dunes with such a distinctive color?

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A Visit to the Coral Pink Sand Dunes

Bishop Pass and Sabrina Lake

After three days in Lone Pine, California, the grand tour of Owens Valley continues, and now it’s time for Bishop.  First stop:  the public land visitor’s center, where I enter the lottery for an overnight permit for the Bishop Pass trail.  It’s a popular trail, but there’s not much competition mid-week, and a little later that morning, after a series of instructions from the Rangers (where to park, where to camp, how to dispose of waste, how to keep bears from eating your food, and not to mention watch out for dead deer on the pass and the thunderstorm forecast for tomorrow afternoon) — I stroll out with permit, map, and rented bear canister in hand.  Now it’s time to prepare for the mission: map the drive to the trailhead, study the route, buy food, pack my pack, and rig up a carrying strap for the bear canister so I can sling it over a shoulder, it being far too large to fit in my 20-liter day pack.

The next morning I’m up at 3:00 AM, determined to steal a march on the weather and secure a parking spot before the crowds….

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Bishop Pass and Sabrina Lake

Moab: First Impressions

Arriving in Moab, Utah toward the end of July, car thermometer reading 100 F, windows down and a/c off (to help me acclimate), yellow sand and orange cliffs swimming in late afternoon haze.  After a quick beer at a local brewery, it’s time to check in at the motel (the cheapest available), and begin planning the next day’s hikes at Arches National Park, located a couple of miles north of town and thus every tourist’s first destination.

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Moab: First Impressions