Creeping up Halcott

Everything was going swimmingly — until the third 400-meter interval at the track, and then a twinge on the left edge of the left foot.  I cut things short and took an easy day (frustrating), returned to the track the following day and had a fine workout with five timed miles (couldn’t be more pleased) and the next day six miles around the park – all good, until the next morning, walking home along the river, and now the left foot is hurting for real.  At 4.25 miles I wave down a taxi.  This aborted walk gets recorded in the training log as code red:  injury.  It might be a stress fracture.  I might soon be thumping around in boot or wheeling about on a knee scooter.  The Grid for June and July is threatened, and not to mention a trip out west I’d just started planning.

I take five days off, during which time I sink into a funk:  sleep late, mope around, watch bad movies, find myself driving below the speed limit.  Perhaps I should scrap all my plans to run and hike and go back to the corporate world and get a job, as I’m bored out of my mind.  But then I come up with some contingency plans:  renew gym membership and swim in the pool, sign up to go bird watching, get back to work on the job hunt, see the Doctor and get an x-ray…

Then an even better idea occurs:  Try the foot out on a short bushwhack in the Catskills where the forest floor is covered in leaves and dirt, a soft and forgiving surface, not the relentless cement which made the foot hurt walking home in the city.  And since force is proportional to speed, I can limit impact by moving very slowly, which would not be hard to do since bushwhacks in the Catskills are always slow — suppose I target a 0.5 MPH pace:  how much damage could that do?

Halcott Mountain comes to mind: it’s just a little over a mile to the summit.  An interesting strategy to clarify my situation.  In one scenario, the bushwhack goes fine, the X-ray comes back negative, and we’re off to the races again with another June peak scratched off the list.  In the other scenario, things don’t go so well – in which case, the summer’s screwed anyhow, so what’s the difference.

“Now bid me run,” says Ligarius in Julius Caesar, “and I will strive with things impossible, yea get the better of them.”

And so with a shout for my loyal page Odysseus the Labradoodle, I lower my visor, level my lance, and ride into battle, to strive with things impossible and perhaps pointless and possibly even ridiculous, but so be it, this is my war, and I shall not give up quite yet….

Continue reading “Creeping up Halcott”

Creeping up Halcott

Balsam and Eagle (for the last time!)

The mission was to climb Balsam and Eagle as part of the Catskills Grid, which is a project that entails ascending each of the thirty-five High Peaks in each month of the year.  I didn’t realize it until I returned and checked the spreadsheet, but this was the 12th time I’ve climbed these two mountains, which means that with respect to the Grid, they’re done.  (Although I will surely return in the future just for fun.)  In terms of overall progress, I’ve now completed 350 out of the required 420 peak-month ascents, leaving 70 to go.  And while there’s no time limit to complete the Grid, for such an important project I feel a sense of urgency to finish it this year.

Continue reading “Balsam and Eagle (for the last time!)”

Balsam and Eagle (for the last time!)

Return to Kaaterskill High Peak

The plan was to run intervals at the track, but it rained during the night, and the morning was cool, damp, misty, cloudy…in a word, uninspiring.  A day crying out to be spent indoors, with plenty of coffee, at work on important tasks.  But of these I had none.  I sat on the sofa, looked out the window, and struggled to come up with a plan to make the day productive.

The irony is, having taken time off from the corporate world….here I am sitting around with time on my hands.  Perhaps I’m suffering from a touch of “Griditis,” a state of fatigue associated with excessive peak-bagging activities.

Further weighing on my state of mind:  a pair of young ultra-runners is out on the Long Path attempting to thru-run the 358-mile trail in 7 days, which would soundly break the current record — which is my record.

I pull up their SPOT track on my laptop and see they are on the move in the Catskills, heading down from North-South Lake Campground toward Kaaterskill High Peak.  Now an idea occurs to me:  I could drive up there, meet them on the trail and cheer them on — and then climb Kaaterskill, scratching it off the list for the June Grid.

The only question, can I face such a grim mountain on such a glum day?

Continue reading “Return to Kaaterskill High Peak”

Return to Kaaterskill High Peak